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of beyond the benghazi incident. i think there's been a dearth of discussion around foreign policy, and in some part that's due because the republicans themselves don't have -- have not verbalized or outlined a foreign policy agenda that's measurably different from that which the president is pursuing. i want to draw your attention to an article in the boston globe, an op ed that says basically the idea of a foreign policy doctrine is outmoded. grand strategies are overrated. they are no more likely to guide this nation to noble he was than painful ones. intervention is fervor, no matter the reason, tends to reflect not reality, but advocacy by people with agendas. one of the issues right now is that the president faces a number of shifting puzzle pieces around the globe. does that, in effect, mean that there cannot be an obama doctrine that applies globally? >> i think it's always helpful for a president and an administration to have a foreign policy and a philosophy about how to approach foreign policy, but you are right that even the greatest enunciation of strategy can be impac
, do you differ in any areas in foreign policy with respect particularly with respect to former yugoslavia republican of mass done ya, and turkey, and care to comment about people in greece who are encouraging closer relations with israel some because they have fallen out with turkey? but i'd like to get some idea who how you view current foreign policy in greece. >> translator: i could tell you that -- is that a country doesn't have continue newty in the foreign policy. we going to come not to do a 180 and turn everything around, but able to give a multidimensional and active tone to our foreign policy. during my meeting with the u.s. ambassador, earlier this week, he told me what does it mean? what is multiidimensional and active foreign policy mean? greece is a country in europe but it's not like the other european countries. we're not lucky enough to be bordered by sweden. our borders are a hot bed. a hot area in the met mediterranean basin inspect is an area that is historically has been a region where there have been attempts to assert one's claims and make attempts associ
about foreign policy? >> history shows us that presidents in their second term focus more on foreign policy than the first term and try to forge a legacy. bill clinton did that in his second term. barack obama will try to focus more on the middle east, maybe more on syria. the most pressing issues are domestic. his voters expect him toct on that. he will attack in the first two years. history also tells us after the midterm election of a second term president start to fade away into sort of a lame duck status. >> interesting analysis there. thank you very much, max. in more international news suicide bombers and gunmen attacked afghanistan's travel police leaving three officers dead and more than three wounded. rather assault began at dawn at the entrance to the complex, the second coordinated raid in as many weeks. taliban claim responsibility. it is feared there could be more of these attacks in the months ahead as international forces prepare to withdraw. voter it is are ready to say goodbye to the chancellor's conservative government. >> it shows the social democrats and greens g
there will be a lot of focus domestic issues. what about foreign policy? >> history shows us that presidents in their second term focus more on foreign policy than the first term and try to forge a legacy. bill clinton did that in his second term. barack obama will try to focus more on the middle east, maybe more on syria. the most pressing issues are domestic. his voters expect him to act on that. he will attack in the first two years. history also tells us after the midterm election of a second term president start to fade away into sort of a lame duck status. >> interesting analysis there. thank you very much, max. in more international news suicide bombers and gunmen attacked afghanistan's travel police leaving three officers dead and more than three wounded. rather assault began at dawn at the entrance to the complex, the second coordinated raid in as many weeks. taliban claim responsibility. it is feared there could be more of these attacks in the months ahead as international forces prepare to withdraw. voter it is are ready to say goodbye to the chancellor's conservative government.
christian conservatives, foreign-policy conservatives, and we pretty much get along on everything. i don't think there's very many things we disagree on. we discussed every issue that comes along every week we have two meetings a year african heads of 100 conservative organization. i can say they are as enthusiastic as either. the movement continues to grow. there's always new young writers coming along. authors periodicals and things that are vibrant for any movement it's going to stay alive. generally speaking given the ups and nasa politics is as good a shape as it is there have. i'm the chairman of the intercollegiate studies institute. others of you have participated there. an organization is events constantly doing a number of amazing things on college campuses across the country. has the largest list of professors associated with any organization sab association, somewhere in the 15,000 to 20,000 range. all sorts of things going on and will continue to go on. to summarize coming back to whittaker chambers, it's safe to say we chambers did as was mentioned earlier in the conference
relations committee, i think a great deal of what good foreign policy about is building personal relationships and building personal relationships with leaders around the world. and the one thing that i've really observed, senator kerry, of you is that you have done that. and we have had so many of these private meetings across over there in the capitol and in the small foreign relations room and i could just feel with meeting with all these leaders, the tremendous respect that they have for you and the ability you are going to have to build on that to make an excellent secretary of state. so i'm very excited about this opportunity for you and i want, in my first question here i wanted to focus on mexico and central america. during the last decade, relations between the united states and mexico have strengthened as a result of our shared security goals relating to the initiative. and one of the pillars of that initiative includes judicial reform and you know this very well. however, the federal government and many of the mexican states have yet to pass legislation which would cha
japanese foreign policy towards the asean region. >> i don't think japan ever saw asean as a great priority. in fact, in japan's world view, you know, america is number one and europe is number two. and asean was way low in the priorities, you know. and i think the key thing for japanese policymakers to understand today is that today europe represents the past. america represents the present. and asia, including southeast asia, represents the future. this is now the future of the world. >> reporter: southeast nations are gaining confidence thanks to their rising economic power. leaders from china frequently visits member nations of asean. three years ago, china and asean abolished most bilateral free trade agreements and tariffs. the deal created the world's largest free trade zone where the combined population of 1.9 billion people. mahbubani says the trade agreement represented a diplomatic defeat for japan. >> it's interesting that the first country to propose a free trade agreement with asean was not japan. it should have been japan. japan should be one step ahead of china in its dealin
obligations under control and set us on a new fiscal course. >> the president's first foreign-policy priority last term was israeli-palestinian peace. it's unlikely to take the top spot the second time, where most expect the president's focus to be on iran. >> it's hard to believe if we can't get a meaningful negotiation within the next two years that you will not have it read capable of producing a nuclear weapons. then, the u.s. has the choice in its negotiations -- will the solution be containment or is it going to be a preventive strike? >> as he takes the oath again, he will do it with the experience of that presidencies are often formed by crises that happened outside of their control. he will know all folksy brought here last i did not change washington. he will try something -- you have to try something new if you want to accomplish his ambitious agenda this type. >> there are reports that algeria special forces have captured five of the kidnappers involved in the past plant incident. they are looking at the side recovering bodies. >> half how many of the hostages seen in the -- how m
the turmoil in north africa overall affected u.s. foreign policy? we get some answers. >> brown: then, two military stories. we get the latest on defense secretary leon panetta's decision to lift the ban on women serving in combat. >> ifill: and we explore the pros and cons of drone warfare and examine the technology behind it-- the subject of tonight's edition of "nova."
's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to tell you that massachusetts is a great teacher of diplomatic skills. whether it was negotiating his way to
the mainstay of british foreign policy for more than a century. yesterday, a member of the state department said that if britain were to leave the european union, that would seriously damage the special relationship between washington and london. >> thank you very much. >> to washington now where u.s. senator john kerry is president obama's choice for the next secretary of state. he has been quizzed by senators ahead of his recommendation. >> the issues like climate change and fighting disease are also priorities. he's expected to easily win approval for the job from the senate. to syria where authorities have called for a million-man prayer at mosques on friday in an effort to stem anti-regime demonstrations. >> the embattled president was also shown on state television praying with syria's spiritual leader to mark the birthday of the prophet mohammad. the fighting around damascus and other cities continues. a french woman who faced 60 years in a mexican jail on kidnapping charges is back in france. >> the 38-year-old was welcomed in paris by relatives and supporters. a mexican supreme cou
of jockbs and what's happening in north africa and foreign policy, at least not yet. where should they make a move? >> if the president is true to his word, he needs to do something about the economy, about job creation. there are more unemployed or underemployed people in this country today than there were when the president first took office. we've seen a 33% increase in spending on welfare programs. the african-american unemployment rate in this country is double the national average. and nothing that the president is talking about right now seems to be geared toward putting those people back to work. >> i want to put some numbers on the screen right now, it's fox news polling that's new and how the people feel about the president now compared with four years ago. 47% disapprove, compared with 16% four years ago and look at the flip-flop in terms of those who approve there on the screen, and 47-65%, the jobs that you're talking about, maybe point a little to that, but there are other things that you've written about in a column. >> absolutely. look, you have a middle class whose incomes
law. he has been co opted but part of that was because the foreign policy was complicity. they welcomed the muslim brotherhood and the white house doing that. we haven't been serious about getting behind executive forces. we were serious about getting behind anti communist parties in the cold war in europe. recreating that would be a much better way to go in my opinion. >> as you look at that part of the world it is volatile. we know terrorists are there. we know right next door the french are fighting in mali to drive out terrorists there. they have already asked for our help. we have a situation in turkey where we put patriot missiles on the ground to help them out they have a civil war next door playing out inside syria. going forward, i mean it sounds like this needs to be a part of the world where we engage but how do we engage without putting our people in harm's way? >> we should be smart about doing it. we have a relatively new u.s. africa command. that's the over riding story of the past couple of months. the nexus of the islamists insurgency in many ways was cen
to be another case where the term becomes almost defined by what's happening abrd by foreign policy? >> i don't think so. i think that -- i mean, the big thing is the deficit and that is something that he needs to tackle. and if he can get a balanced agreement where you have, you know, on a sustainable basis, not just in this short-term, but in the medium and long-term within reduction in expenditure and some increases in taxes, i think that would be good. on the other hand, you have the gun control question which is another big domestic issue which is going to to drain a lot of his political capital, but which he's decided to get stuck into and i don't think there's any retreat from that now. >> final question, do you expect there to be a grand bargain, yes or no, this year or during his second term when it comes to deficit and debt reduction? >> i do expect it in his second term, yes. >> pippa? >> i don't. >> okay. more skepticism about it, but we like your optimism. maybe they will be inspired to come to some sort of agreement. stay there, both of you. next, we'll bring you the latest on a
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
should be our foreign policy, keeping gadhafi empower, is that four or in opposition to american interests? i don't get them as issues' notebook. those are policy issues. i'm mainly concerned with regime issues. but you take your point, i am making a distinction between the democratic sovereignty and so i guess they don't have an objection to the overthrow of the burmese government. it would have an objection is a policy, i don't think to be a good policy to change every country in the world i am not advocating not in any sense. we can argue about different policies. i'm saying is a form of government, the liberal democratic nationstate is superior to other forms of government. one would be global governance. others isn't autocratic regime. i talk about russia and china has autocratic regimes than i do see any problem pushiness countries in a democratic direction, not by force, the public affairs and so on would be an acceptable policy. we could do it or not do it is a policy decision. of course there is radical islam, which establishes sharia as the constitutional structure and
to one another must be equally as well. >> reporter: foreign policy was noticeably absent from his address though he harolded a decade of war, touting a recovering economy and acknowledged the lessons still ahead. >> the commitments we make to each other, these things do not sap our nation. they strengthen us. >> reporter: he gave mitt romney this line. >> they do not make us a nation of tears. ♪ la >> reporter: filling the air what patriotism, kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ the brave there was a poem and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the country. john? >> dan, that moment at the end of your piece where the president turned around and look
of using it as an extension of their foreign policy. they have generally been fuelling and funding this for many decades. the algearians need to be confronted. if you are going to be taken seriously, you cannot support terrorist groups either inside or outside their borders. >> michael: and the about that they operated almost unilaterally in trying to free the hostages speaks to that they need to be confronted on that. the book is "leading from behind." richard miniter thanks for being here in "the war room." coming up it's the one time americans get to say to the british, see we can do pomp and circumstance just as well as you can. and republican leaders are on a secret retreat. we'll let you in on that secret. and later, the man, the myth, the legend that's right joe biden's exploits are pit to paper. it's a friday night in "the war room," and we're just getting started, so stick around. [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? irene
's inaugural inaugural, it is obvious that have a checklist -- took list of issues to mention. foreign policy, gay-rights, and did briefly mention education. >> no single person can trade of the single math and science teachers read for the future. we must harness new ideas to revamp the tax code and reform our schools and empower citizens with the skills they need to work harder and reach higher. lou: he did not actually say education but he did mention the word reform. he wants to change everything. if you believe the data the federal education department puts out you may think there is no need it only reflected the reality. the education department is a giddy that shows high-school graduation rate is 78-point to%. 70-point to% that is a 35 year, and not a high but the best this report, think about it. 21% is not getting it done. the education department also notes, about this, the national dropout rate is 3 percent overall down from 4% last year. are you kidding me? if only 78.2% are getting it done how does that end up at 3%? new mask? federal math? political math. is a joke not funny bro
's foreign policy, aid related or diplomacy in our presence throughout the world. you know, if you look back to, say, congress can 20, 25 years ago, it was essentially made up of people who had a relationship to world war ii and its aftermath in terms of u.s. global engagement, the marshall plan and the rebuilding of japan and america's presence. and the relationship also, i mean, and the lessons and the threat posed by the cold war. and those were very defining, major umbrella issues that produced great statesmen, henry jackson and others, on a bipartisan politics at the water's edge, america's presence b and engagement around the world. two superpowers of the um real la that kind of -- umbrella was kind of held over the world and stifled the kind of regional and local factions and tensions that erupted after the end of the cold war. that all had a significant impact on the american people and commitment, i think, and support for the commitment for the u.s. to be a global, globally engaged, the superpower. um, it was the possibility of a five-alarm fire, and everybody's in to try to keep th
. this is an ancient tradition that doesn't harm people. the arrogance by which the united states foreign policy trusted dictate terms to countries like bolivia, less than 1% of any excess cocaine in bolivia ends up in the united states. the heavy-handed nature of u.s. policy, you would think this is can't -- some kind of flood. now imagine if the united nations and the guardians of the un convention were to treat coffee with the content they treat cocoa. what would happen if they told bolivia's and peruvians you have to stop chewing coca which they have been doing for centuries, if not thousands of years? imagine if they did that to the united states. you have to give up this habit. what would happen? well, a friend of mine actually did this. andrew epstein went to amherst college. in 2001 he conspired with the school demonstration in student government to secretly been coffee for one day without notice during finals week. so all the students get up the morning. there's no coffee in the cafeteria, bookstore, no coffee being sold on campus. they have fans dress up and trenchcoats as drug dealers
tradition that doesn't harm people and the arrogance by which the foreign policy traced to dictate terms and countries like bolivia less than 1% of any excess cocaine in bolivia and set in the united states. and the heavy-handed nature of the policy would think this is some kind of a flood from bolivia the way that we dictate terms in this country. now imagine if the united nations and the u.n. convention were to treat coffee the way with the content they treat coca what would happen if they tell oblivion's chewing coca which they'd been doing for centuries if not thousands of years imagine if they did that to the united states you have to give up this habit now. she was a major that went to elmhurst college, and in 2001 he comes by europe with the administration to secretly them coffee for one day without notice during finals week as a project so all these students get up in the morning and there's no coffee in the bookstore area sold on campus and they have friends dress up in trenchcoats as drug dealers. you want to buy a shot of espresso? $6. and people were actually buying this stuf
in africa, and the challenges for u.s foreign policy. the attack on the u.s. consulate we're joined by former u.s. diplomat nicholas burns who served in republican and democratic administrations, he's now with the kennedy school of government and harvard university. and danielle pletka, vice president for foreign and defense studies at the american enterprise institute. with you and start with benghazi. was there more light shed today. where do things stand in terms of understanding what happened and the response to it? >> well, jeffrey, i thought it was a commanding performance by secretary clinton. she was well informed. she was a master of the detail, and all the-- and she took responsibility, which was the right thing to do. she said that she will implement all the 29 recommendations of the accountability review board. now, i think the republicans there obviously had a right-- and i think they had an obligation to ask tough questions because this was a disaster for the american foreign service to lose four people in one day, including ambassador chris stevens. but i must say jus
a member of the appropriations committee speaks to the council on foreign relations on how foreign policy is affected by the budget and debt. that is at 830 eastern. and janet napolitano will focus on cybersecurity and immigration and terrorism and disaster relief. that will be at 9:30 p.m. on c-span3. on c-span, at 10:00 a.m. eastern, massachusetts senator john kerry testifies before the foreign relations committee. is it against the confirmation process for john kerry and secretary of state. he is scheduled to be introduced by secretary of state hillary clinton. >> this started in the 1940s with sylvia porter. and has been in the 1930s, the hard economic times of the 1930s. we see everything from alcoholics anonymous to napoleon thinking they can get rich and fascism and communism, and that was something that you can feel at the time. there is a cool thing going on at that time. and so we developed personal-finance out of this. sylvia's goal is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. but it is of its time. the idea that we can teach people certain skills
around a long time. at the end of the day, the foreign policy will come out of the white house. >> i think there is some truth to that. treasury policy will be run out of the white house. the president will have a strong partner. and articulate partner with a reputation for pushing a hard bargain. jack lose primary role here will be to pushing for that. dagen: jack lew may be staring at a sudden unexpected spike in interest rates. >> that is why it is interesting they chose someone with no expertise. it could come back to haunt them. i do not think that will be his role. his role will be the press. if he cannot succeed, then to push for the 2014 elections. connell: they do not know that much about her. what should they know? >> she deserves high marks for her prosecution for the first world trade center bombing. george bush capper on for a while. she deserves high marks for that. [talking over each other] >> it was a pretty strong case. it was a less than vigorous prosecution of teamsters. she took some hits for that. it will be more of the same. her predecessor, mary schapiro, was k
in algeria that this is basically how the u.s. is going to conduct foreign policy when it comes to that issue in the world, this idea of leading from behind? >> i think that that is -- has certainly been the tenor recently and it looks like it will continue to be. let's lead from behind. let's provide support where we can. but let's not just get actively involved and in it up to our wastes. >> okay. we'll leave it there. we appreciate your time from houston this morning. >>> now, over to japan. a speed change in mon tar policy under way and a share role on tokyo and equation. >> foifrt fist time, the bank of japan a suggesting'ing a 2% pure chasing. from the jot set, today's decision was an exercise, so to speak, in showing that the central bank and the government are on the same page when it comes to trying reflat the japanese economy. here is what the governor had to say. >> the government has again pledged to take concrete steps towards the sustainable fiscal struck structure. we have high expectations for the government's measures. >> but here comes the tricky part. the bank of japan is a
on foreign policy. >>> take a look at this. unless you are at all claustrophobic. this oregon woman spent four hours trapped in an eight-inch space. this happened early wednesday morning in downtown portland. she apparently fell from a second floor smoking area, and getting her out, so tough. firefighter has to cut through a section of wall and use airbags to widen the space. rich chapman is the firefighter who pulled this woman out. >> to get her out, get her out as soon as possible and we weren't going home without her. that was it. we used basically soapy water to lube up the sides of the walls, and between us and her, she was getting out. >> airbags and soapy water. unbelievable, and look on her face when she made it out. oh, what a relief. >> oh, my goodness. good for her. >>> a detroit air man says he was fishing for perch. but he found gold. last friday as in a big, gargantuan goldfish. three pounds, close to 15 inches long. the fisherman has fished lake st. clair, 15 years, and this is his first goldfish. >> looks like something from the simpsons. >> 4 minutes after the hour. the
far. >> i have a foreign policy question but first i wanted to ask, for the administration's response, the house has now passed the three-month suspension of the u.s. debt ceiling. what's your comments? >> it's the same as it was yesterday. the president believes that we need to, as a country, do the responsible thing and without drama or delay pay our bills. meet our commitments. ideally we would extend a raise -- or raise the debt ceiling for a long period of time so that this is not a question, so that the uncertainty that has surrounded this issue of late because of the political strategy that house republicans have taken will be removed or would be removed. it is certainly important to recognize that the bill that passed the house today, the position that the house republicans took beginning late last week represents a fundamental change from a strategy that they pursued up until this point which is to try to link the debt ceiling to an ideological agenda of spending cuts in which the choice presented to the american people was, either face dramatic cuts in social security or med
.s. bishops' outreach and service to refugees. he's an expert in foreign policy and migration trends worldwide. ambassador, thank you for joining us. >> thank you so much, ali. and thank you for the extra ambassadorship. i only had four. [laughter] i'd like to thank ali and the forum and all of you for the invitation to be here today to say a few words. and to, um, i'd also like to thank all of the other members of the panel here for their or contributions. i'm here to represent the conference of catholic bishops. it's known sometimes by just usccb. the conference has been engaged in this issue of immigration reform for decades. we look forward to this debate and urge our elected officials not to lose this opportunity to reform a broken system. there are several areas the bishops will focus upon in this debate. first, there must be an automatic path to citizenship for the 11 million undocumented. we cannot and must not, excuse me, fall short of citizenship for the undocumented. where instead they receive legal status but no chance to become americans. we should not sanction a permanent undercl
of their foreign exchange policy for their own self-interests. but no, i don't see this as a long-term shift towards currency management, towards fixed exchange rates. >> okay. jim, i have a question for you, how does the japanese yen fit into all of this? it is in the news all the time because of the bank of japan and everything they are doing to ease monetary policy, stimulate the economy, what are your thoughts on the yen? >> it's a great question. the japanese yen is the exception to almost everything. the u.s. policy is to cheapen the dollar against all major trading partners, taiwan, korea, china, europe and the rest. japan is an exception. number one, they need the help. they need some help. number two, and they have nothing else going for them, lousy demographics, high debt to gdp etc. the other reason is they have now become the buyer of last resort of treasuries. it used to be china's job, but china is reducing its net purchase of treasuries. if you notice, japan is increasing them. the fed is kind of cutting japan a break saying hey we will let you cheapen against the dollar as lo
to the middle east and try to become a big foreign policy president. he's getting us out of wars in iraq and afghanistan and eisenhower got us out of korea. i think ike's in the air these days. it's a -- eisenhower revision going on. >> douglas brinkley, thanks so much for coming in. >> the connections to the past and past presidents is always so fun it look at and so amazing how there are so many similarities. when we get back, we'll have the latest news of the day, of course, plus a behind the scenes look what's happening at the white house this inauguration weekend. >> first we want to give you this week's look at the human factor. >> miss montana surrounded by more than 50 other beauty queens on stage. all hoping to become miss america. but for most of her early life, alexis weinman spent her time alone. >> i was very quiet because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i really didn't have any friends. >> her parents knew there was something wrong but their small town of cutbank, montana didn't have the resources to help them figure out what it was. at t
of collective action on issues like foreign policy and trade, and when we leave the door from the open to new members. a new settlement subject to the democratic legitimacy and accountability of national parliaments where member states combined in flexible cooperation, respecting national differences and not always trying to eliminate them, and in which we have proved that some powers can, in fact, be returned to member states. in other words, a settlement which would be entirely in keeping with the mission for an updated european union i have described today. more flexible, more adaptable, more open, fit for the challenges of the modern age. now, to those who say, and there are those who say it, that a new settlement can't be negotiated, i would say listen to the views of other parties in other european countries arguing for powers to flow back to european states. and also look to at what we've achieved already. we have ended the obligation for britain to bail out the eurozone members. we have kept britain out of the fiscal compact. we have launched a process which turns an existing justice
care of us. >> it happened so fast. >> around 30 foreigners remain unaccounted for, and there's been mounting criticism of the algerian authorities' information policies, but those who did escape unscathed praised the authorities. >> i was very impressed with the algerian army. >> very, very relieved. >> the international nature of the hostage crisis has raised concern the world over. in london, british prime minister david cameron postponed a much-awaited speech on europe to deal with the crisis. >> the algerian prime minister just told me this morning they are now looking at possible routes to resolve this crisis. >> with so many still unaccounted for and reports that some terrorists are still holed up in the installation, the wait continues for news from the remote gas field -- with so many insurgents dating back to a civil war with the country's -- when the country eradicate some of the most violent domestic groups. many -- >> many of the islamists are thought to be a new generation of foreign jihadists, hardened on the battlefields of iraq and afghanistan. >> they've been allowe
for britain itself because outside of europe it would be difficult. the german foreign minister says that berlin wants them to be an active member, but that cherry picking policies is not an option. the president of the european parliament said that the speech was one of the worst he had heard in a long time. that is just some of the reaction. a german member of the european parliament, we will be going to him in a moment. thank you for being with us here on "gmt." dr. fox, and you can see the problem, can you? you heard it from europe. there are not many people that david cameron can renegotiate with by the sounds of it. >> except for one thing, as a response to the eurozone crisis there will have to be a different relationship inside the european union. many countries want a different relationship from what currently exists. there is going to be changed. the status quo will not be an option. the idea of britain changing the dynamic is disingenuous, but there is going to be changed inside that relationship. we want the direction of travel to be different, a looser relationship. i ha
public policy, it is a foreign concept. that is exactly what martin did. he put love at the center of the public square. why have we abandoned that notion? >> the rule of money. everybody and everything is up for sale. you cannot have integrity, love, you cannot have trust if everything and everybody is up for sale. if you're leaders are up for sale, they will talk one way, get inside, and do something else. it is big money. for black people who have been hated for 400 years, hatred comingized a stric after us, and we dish out martin king, that love in the face of the hatred, that is a spiritual and moral high ground. the whole country has to take note of it with martin. the whole world has to take note of it. that is what is weak and feeble. it is not a question of speed -- skin pigmentation. it is a question of equality and morality of your speech rowdy. all of us fall short. [applause] >> now it is competition. the president takes no child left behind, which is the worst education law in my lifetime -- [applause] straight out of charles dickens. train them for exams, do not let
on ongoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our country's reckless policies. this is robbing our cities and states of critical investments and infrastructure like bridges, ports and levees. every dollar we pay in interest is a dollar that is not going to investment in america's priorities. instead, interest payments are a significant tax on all americans, a debt tax, that washington doesn't want to talk about. increasing america's debt weakens domestically and internationally. leadership means that the buck stops here. instead, washington is shifting the burden on bad choices today onto the backs of our children and grandchildren. america has a debt problem. and a failure of leadership. americans deserve better. all of those words were taken from then senator obama's statement before he voted against raising the debt ceiling in 2006. truer words cannot have been spoken today. the debt burden the president was concerned about a few years ago is still a very real threat today. congress should pass a responsible budget so we have a road map to get to our serious
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